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Thread: Can i eat chicken and meat with rosacea?

  1. #1
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    Default Can i eat chicken and meat with rosacea?

    I read contrasting opinions about eating chicken and meat with roasacea. Having already given up at the idea of eating spicy food, tomatoes, cheese and fish, I really hope that I can eat those foods and I would like to have yours opinions.
    many thanks!

  2. #2
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    people with rosacea react in different ways to different foods
    so you'll have to experiment with your diet and decide for yourself what you can eat

  3. #3
    Senior Member dave75's Avatar
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    Default re

    good point dora, its a matter of trial and error...you have to experiment and see what works and what doesn't. I can eat chicken and red meat no problemo.

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    yep ... and i don't seem to have any problem with reasonable amounts of tomatoes or spices.
    besides our different reactions, there's also another variable, at least for some of us:
    how much we're prepared to give up in exchange for better skin.
    some of us can decide we love XYZ too much to give it up totally even though it causes some skin problems.
    (i know some people's reactions to some things are too severe to bear, but for a lot of us
    there is some leeway with some foods/activities, and we can make informed decisions that we can live with the repercussions.)
    it's similar with certain medications: i've read that some of the meds i take aren't good for rosacean skin,
    but i choose to take them anyway, to deal with other health problems.
    we each make our own choices about how to adjust our lives to the fact that we have rosacea.
    Last edited by dora; 3rd April 2011 at 06:32 AM.

  5. #5
    Member brook's Avatar
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    I agree Dora, my favorite foods and drinks (Crown Royal and Redwine) are contraindicated for rosacea. I also adore spicy food, and am having to consider the condition of my face vs lifestyle and food choices. For me it's a difficult decision to make, and I'm definitely pushing my luck.

  6. #6
    Senior Member nat007's Avatar
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    There are so many food theories, and so many rosaceans who respond different to foods, that it can become very confusing....
    I think it's best to really take some time to find out what your face can and can't handle. So eat one type of food for a day perhaps, and see how it looks short after and the next day. Not the nicest day spending, I agree, but well, it might bring some light on your specific food triggers. I did it like this at least.
    Some people respond badly to wheat or dairy, others not at all. Some to red meat, others do well on it.

    I have a very reactive skin, and have many food triggers therefore, but someone once gave a link to a site, which tells you the pro- or anti-inflammatory values of foods, and so far they work for me:

    http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...roducts/3129/2

    I work with it like this: I base my diet on my specific skin reactions to foods, that is the basis, the practicle experience. But I also check it with this site, and foods that I like that are highly inflammatory, I eat in moderation.
    Foods that are anti-inflammatory (many vegetables, some fruits, sweet potatoes, apricots, some nuts, some types of fish) all seem to go well with my skin, I even feel that my skin is more pale and calmer when I stick more to this diet.

    I once saw a traditional Chinese doctor, and she gave me a list with inflammatory foods to avoid. It helped my friend to get rid of her persistant eczema, and the list matches this database, so there might be some truth in it.

    In general I think you are good off in every respect when you try to eat balanced and healthy: not too many sugar, fresh foods instead of prepacked and processed, enough vegetables. I eat meat, but always organic meat. It might be psychosomatic, but when I eat non organic chicken, I am always more red and have break outs the next day. I fully believe that the amounts of hormones and antibiotics that are put into those animals, gets in our systems too.

    Hope I don't gave too much info, the bottom line is that you might want to find your own food triggers and eat healthy and balanced; that's not only good for your skin, but also for your overall health...

    Best wishes Natalja
    Uses: 22,5 mg mirtazapine, clonidine and propranolol, Xyzal at times.
    Diet: trying low sugar, no gluten and dairy, high protein diet.
    Link to my rosacea blog http://scarletnat.blogspot.com

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    Default Hi

    Thanks Natalja, the website is very useful and I must say also correct. In fact, yesterday night I ate chicken - which result high inflammatory in that website- and this morning when I woke up I had some flare-ups, then I deduce that chicken is not good for me. Nonetheless I will try to eat it another time, just to confirm that.

  8. #8
    Senior Member nat007's Avatar
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    Hi Pie,

    well, I would use that site only as a guide line, as I wrote, some foods are noted as 'bad' but cause little problem for me. Also make sure you have a somewhat balanced diet, or you might get other problems. So eat a few times a week meat, for instance. I believe that duck is mildly anti-inflammatory, and I indeed have little problems with it. Where I live it's easy to find and buy, not sure about your place. But at least you get all the nutritions you need, especially vit. B12, by eating some meats. And check out some fish in the tabel too: white fish like sole are highly anti-inflammatory according to this site. Just make sure you eat it either freshly caught, or buy it frozen: that way you won't have high histamine levels in the fish (if you have it in the fridge too long, histamine levels will raise significantly, and that can also cause a flush).
    Also: when you prepare foods, there are ways that can add inflammation factors to it: especially deep frying. Best is to steam or cook (little water to keep the vitamins). But then it all tasts bland (blend?) to me, quite boring I find personally, so I stir fry most of my foods with olive oil or some water to let it simmer. But be careful with frying your foods, that will defo. cause more inflammation.

    I found it all overwhelming at first, but after so many years I got used to it and my skin tells me very quickly when I eat right or wrong..

    best of luck!
    Uses: 22,5 mg mirtazapine, clonidine and propranolol, Xyzal at times.
    Diet: trying low sugar, no gluten and dairy, high protein diet.
    Link to my rosacea blog http://scarletnat.blogspot.com

  9. #9
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    I've done alot of experimentation trial and error with foods and the less preservatives and gluten free natural foods tend to do better for me. I've started eating chicken, red meat, hot dogs and spices lately which seem to be okay. I eat alot of fish too for the oils. I do think moderation is best for me.

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