Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Oleic Acid vs. Linoleic Acid in Sebum

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    115

    Default Oleic Acid vs. Linoleic Acid in Sebum

    This is very interesting!

    I was doing some research on oleic acid in sebum and found that oleic acid is found in sebum that is lacking in linoleic acid (an EFA - Essential Fatty Acid).

    Then I found this at wikipedia.org/wiki/Linoleic_acid:
    "Dermatitis is one of the first signs of an Essential Fatty Acid deficiency in both humans and animals. Until 1955, one of the most widely applied treatments for atopic eczema was a high dose of GLA." (Gamma-linolenic acid)

    And this at umm.edu/altmed/articles/gamma-linolenic-000305.htm:
    "Gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) is an omega-6 fatty acid that is found mostly in plant-based oils. Omega-6 fatty acids are considered essential fatty acids: They are necessary for human health but the body can' t make them -- you have to get them through food."

    So, in summary, if we can eliminate oleic acid on the outside of our bodies by not putting it on our skin, but want to keep it from forming in our own sebum, it all goes back to a healthy diet, which will give us the EFA's that we so desperately need to control seb derm, etc.

    I actually get a lot of EFA's because I eat flax seeds and take Udo's Oil (and I try to eat well). So I find it interesting that once I stopped introducing oleic acid to my face (i.e. jojoba oil, coconut oil) that my skin had an immediate turn-around (and I do mean immediate - overnight!). Interestingly enough, those good oils that our bodies need so desperately on the inside, are the very culprits when used on the outside. They contain oleic acid, but on the inside of the body they work differently than on the outside.

    I'm wondering, however, why the stop of GLA to dermatitis sufferers in 1955? Could it be that since the pharmaceutical companies can't patent a natural product and make money on it, they "convinced" the doctors to steer clear of the natural healers and push the pharmaceuticals? Just a thought.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,337

    Default

    Hi -

    I agree with you. My skin feels oily, redder and looks worse with any kind of oil that sits on my skin (including essential oils). However, supplements, like organic flax seeds or Omega 3/6 help my skin. Thanks for putting some information out here on this.

    Cheers,
    Yvette

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    115

    Default

    You are very welcome! It was actually Shrimpy and LadyBee in another thread who led me in this direction. They told me about oleic acid and so I searched it out and learned a lot! So, really, I'm just playing this by ear and figuring it out as I go along with help from the people here in this forum.

    So ... my plan of action now is to keep on using raw honey as a wash and mask. I was using a little bit of tea tree oil mixed with the raw honey for added fungi killing, but now that I've had overnight success by getting rid of the jojoba and coconut oils on my face, I'll see how the raw honey does on its own (because tea tree oil is drying). I like the raw honey because I really can get away with putting nothing on my face after I use the raw honey, since it moisturizes the skin as well as fights fungus and bacteria, etc.

    I've been using jojoba oil for years and just recently developed seb derm. It makes me so mad to think that what I thought was good for my skin, was actually harming it (for me, personally, anyway ... I'm sure there are those who can use jojoba oil with no problem). So, essentially, I've been shooting myself in the foot. But I've learned a lot and am continuing to learn, so for that I am grateful!

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    60

    Default

    is it damaging to consume oleic acid internally?

    I bought flax seed capsules today and in the ingredients/contents list, it mentions linoleic acid and oleic acid.

    Also, what are some foods high in EFA's besides green veggies?

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    115

    Default

    Oleic acid on the inside of the body seems to do different things than when it's on the outside of the body. (Just from the information that I gathered while researching this.) EFAs are SO necessary for us and they contain oleic acid. Some people do great with putting oleic acid containing oils on their faces. Others aren't so lucky. But inside - we absolutely need them, oleic acid and all.

    Sounds like you're on the right track with EFAs. Flax seeds (consumed as oil or in their seed state) are a fantastic source. And, of course, greens are very good, too. Cold water fish, like salmon, sardines, etc. are very good as well. For a complete list, you can Google for that very helpful information.
    Last edited by Anonymous; 11th January 2011 at 10:56 PM.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    115

    Default

    By the way, when skin problems like dermatitis arise, it can mean that not enough EFAs are being consumed internally. So, something like oleic acid that can cause problems when applied topically, can be the very cause of the dermatitis if it *isn't* being consumed internally. Weird huh?!

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    60

    Default

    weird indeed

    flax seed capsules are not as good as consuming it in oil/raw form?

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    115

    Default

    My rule of thumb is to try and eat as naturally as possible (which can be hard sometimes in our "civilized" society). So, the closer that the food is to the way God/nature made it, the better. But I also live in the real world and when the rubber hits the road, convenience is key. So I try to get as many EFAs from my food as I can, which includes flax seeds. But for a quick, convenient smoothy, I'll add some Udo's Oil for good measure. I get it at my local health food store in the refrigerator.

    So as far as the flax seed oil capsules are concerned, I don't know anything about them, but I figure 50% of something is better than 100% of nothing. I'd still go ahead and use them for convience's sake. Maybe try to incorporate flax seeds sprinkled over salads, soups, etc. for more healthy benefits straight from the seed. Just any way you can incorporate those good oils into your diet will be beneficial.

    http://www.netrition.com/udos_choice_page.html (For some reason, www.udoerasmus.com isn't working today, but this other site will tell you about the benefits of Udo's Oil.)

    http://www.bubbleandbee.com/servlet/...eds/Categories (I, personally, like the golden flax seeds ... plus they have slightly more Omega 3s. I get a big bottle and keep it in my fridge -lasts longer that way- and grab it to quickly sprinkle over my food - salad, soup, cereal ..... )

  9. #9
    Member coopx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    49

    Default

    I also heard that EFA must be balance or something like 2:1 ratio of Omega3/6, and the UDO has that ratio thing, im gonna grab one next week on my local Vitamin Shoppe store: http://www.vitaminshoppe.com/store/e...jsp?id=FL-7029

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    115

    Default

    Yes, you are exactly right. 2:1 ratio of Omega 3 to Omega 6. We get a lot of Omega 6 easily in our diets. It's the Omega 3 that is the problem, so we need more of that to offset the high Omega 6 intake.

Similar Threads

  1. Why is coconut oil treatment reccomended if it has oleic acid
    By patrick_bateman in forum Similar and co-existing conditions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 13th December 2012, 09:39 PM
  2. Seb Derm, Oleic Acid and Malassezia
    By Dee28 in forum Similar and co-existing conditions
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 15th April 2011, 02:57 PM
  3. Oleic Acid vs. Linoleic Acid in Sebum
    By Anonymous in forum Diet, lifestyle and relationships
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 1st January 2011, 06:04 PM
  4. Is Conjugated Linoleic Acid safe for rosacea?
    By mikey in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 4th October 2005, 03:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •