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Thread: Managing Blepharitis: Lid Care product I'd strongly advise

  1. #1
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    Default Managing Blepharitis: Lid Care product I'd strongly advise

    Hi all,

    I've suffered on and off with blepharitis for many years. The pathology of the condition appears clear if my own situation can be considered typical, that it is a direct consequence of Meibomian gland dysfunction, leading to decreased/aberrant secretion from these glands (plus the occasional blockage of these glands leading to chalazia, thereby making the problem worse from irritation of the eye by the swollen mass) and an inflammatory reaction to antigens either deriving from deposited material itself or from bacterial growth in the material that deposits on the lids due to all these issues mentioned.

    One interesting thing I might add to the information I have read in this forum is that this problem for me began during/following an Adenoviral infection in both eyes which persisted for a few months and led to thick yellow discharge that would appear dried and accumulated after waking up in the morning. A familiar pattern would be that this material would dry on the lid margins, then crack and lead to small lesions which became inflamed. Being only 18 at the time I hadn't the wisdom to know I had to clean it off diligently so that bacterial growth would not occur within this material and infect the lesions leading to lid margin swelling. I had no previous history of any sort of reddening of the lid margins or MGD before this point in my life. I think this persistent infection over several months sparked the condition and it has been a recurrent problem since unless managed properly. Since Adenoviral eye infections are relatively common, especially in adolescents, I would be interested in hearing whether anyone else recalls a similar infection sparking their problem(s). This connection may be of interest to clinical virologists/eye specialists who may not have previously linked the two conditions. I am a research virologist by trade myself and have never come across mention of this connection in the literature before. Nor do I have an interest in pursuing it academically!

    Now, I have diligently tried a number of the standard treatments advised and here's my five pennies:

    1. Cortisone creams: do work, and work well obviously. Only a temporary solution to the inflammation, not viable as a routine treatment and doesn't deal with the underlying condition in which blepharitis is allowed to occur.

    2. Warm lid compresses: reduce the instance of chalazion formation for sure. I haven't had one since and I was getting a bad one once a year (that would persists for up to a year) on average before. They also appear to reduce blepharitis when used with my suggested product below. I wont say more about that since it's dealth with clearly and well in other sections of the forum.

    3. Lid Scrubs: virtually cure the condition, well sorry that's an exaggeration it manages the condition, it cannot be cured per se. The actual product needs to be paid careful attention to though. I have tried many of the conventional treatments with detergent-based ones such as baby shampoo and, at least for me, even dilute detergent causes a slight but continual irritation of the eye for hours after thereby making the condition worse in the long run. What does work very well for me is to use something intended to be put near eyes or that the eye environment tolerates: women's eye make-up remover. Specifically I found 'L'Oreal dermo-expertise gentle eye make-up remover' works best and only costs 2 pound in the UK for a 125ml bottle (keep this closed when not used, it is essential everything you put near your eyes is clean). Simply apply a ml or two to a dense-knit, circular cotton wool pad (keep these as clean as possible or even sterile, reseal bag immediately after opening). Apply wet cotton wool pad along the lid margins both upper and lower taking great care not to get too much of it in your eye, in excess it can be irritating. For MGD sufferers (most people I think with recurrent blepheritis) pay careful attention cleaning the opening of these glands which are found between the region at the top of the lash margin and the point of the contact of the lid with the eye itself, keeping these openings clean (along with regular warm compresses, see above) is essential for avoiding chalazion formation and for helping reduce the overall blepharitis problem too.

    Do this twice per day, once IMMEDIATELY after waking up because once you open your eyes the secretions that build up during the night settle properly on the lid margins to dry and once before going to bed. The longer the material is deposited on the lid margin, the more bacterial replication and therefore inflammation you get. Also do it if you feel a tingle of irritation which brings me onto the last point. Where possible do not touch your eyelids under any circumstances with less than soap-cleaned hands at any point. Learn proper aseptic technique and be mindful of where you are smearing dirty hands (with lots of nasty microorganisms) to your eyelids. This is a major contributing factor to the problem in my opinion.

    Also, if you are just starting to do this you might find the problem gets worse for a few days, this is likely because you are further irritating already irritated lid margins, it takes a few days for the inflammation in the now clean area to settle down (cortisone cream would likely help at this early stage). Obviously if it's getting worse and stays worse after a week, stop using it as you might be allergic to something in it. Once it does settle down, you need to maintain this routine or the problem reoccurs. Remember it's managed not cured.

    If I adhere to these rules, I don't get eyelid inflammation at all, if I slack I do. In life, you don't commonly get clearer proof of cause and effect than that!

    Good luck!
    Last edited by Amadain; 17th September 2010 at 04:38 PM.

  2. #2
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    Amadain, thanks so much for your helpful information.

    I agree with you i can only miss maybe 1 night but more and i get my eye problems back.

    How do you do your warm compresses?

    I use square soft cottons 2 together for each eye and apply as hot water as my eyes tolerate on both eyes for 5 minutes each night. But i feel that the water is making that eye area drier.

    Thanks again,

    Alba
    using elidel at night, taking atelenol, had 2 vbeam laser treatments, 46 year old female

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    Hi Alba,

    No problem , my pleasure I hope it helps

    Re. warm compresses. I have to admit I don't do them as often as I should, maybe once a week or when I remember. Actually it seems to me that just diligent cleaning of the lid area I mentioned above (where the actual openings to the meibomian glands are) using the non-irritable make-up remover is sufficient to counter most of the problems with blockage if chalazions are a problem.

    When I do do them I use a cheap hot water bottle, yes the rubber kind. I first fill this with warm water (comfortably warm on your face, not boiling and take care not to scald yourself in the process!). Then, once filled, I clean the outside of it well or cover it with a washed, clean hot water bottle cover or you can even put cotton wool pads over your eyes to distance them from the bottle. I then put on some tunes and lie down and place it over my eyes and relax for about five minutes (think of it as enforced relaxation!). I then take it off my eyes then, place a finger on the outside edge of the eye and pull the skin back about a cm towards the ear so that the eye is squinted outwards. It's important to do this whilst your eyelids are warm since the warmth liquefies the hardened meibomian gland secretions (think candle wax) therein making them easier to force out by physical manipulation. Then take the other hand and use the index finger to rub firmly from inside to outside of the eye-lid horizonatally on the upper and lower lid. Do it in a way that you can imagine you're literally forcing material out of the sack-like glands with span across the lid in vertical lines, so start at the top of the lid and work down to the openings in the lid margin. Remember, use clean soap-washed hands for all of this - I hate to sound like some kind of mental Howard Hughes case but it is important! Repeat this again for another five minutes if you can stand it. Once this is done, wash your face and clean the lids with the cleanser mentioned. This helps recommence relatively normal secretion and prevents the kind of build up that can lead to blockage, eye dryness, belpharitis and later a nasty chalazion.

    Re. dryness, yeah cleaning does make your skin dryer (not as dry as soap does if using the product I mentioned). I also use a decent facial moisturizer over my general face after washing my face/cleaning lids, this helps, obviously you can't use it at the lid margins because that itself causes irritation (what doesn't I hear you ask!).

    Oh, one other thing I noticed over the years is not to let non-sterile water, non-isotonic (tap water is far from sterile or isotonic). get into your eyes when washing your face, keep your eyes tightly closed, if it does get in you get the old cycle again: irritation, protective secretions followed by our old friend blepharitis.
    Last edited by Amadain; 17th September 2010 at 05:26 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Auburn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amadain View Post

    1. Cortisone creams: do work, and work well obviously. Only a temporary solution to the inflammation, not viable as a routine treatment and doesn't deal with the underlying condition in which blepharitis is allowed to occur.
    Steroid creams stop the immune system from creating inflammation. This is not a good thing when the cause of the inflammation is not curable. For chronic conditions such as blepharitis and dermatitis, steroids should be avoided.

    Glad to hear your method works for you, though. I've discovered that, simply cleansing (which includes a gentle eyelid and eyelash massage) twice daily with raw honey and moisturizing with coconut oil does the job.

    Cheers
    *
    I've treated seb derm successfully with raw honey and virgin coconut oil and have been symptom-free since June '09. Follow this ---> link <--- for details.

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    Thanks a bunch Amadain.

    Auburn,

    how to you cleanse with the raw honey your eye lids top and bottom? doesnt it get in your eyes? I would love to cut out the warm compresses which i have to do nightly, so tired of being in the bathroom for an hour or so between warm compresses, eye lid cleaning, taking makeup off, applying creams etc and so on I dread each night such a drag. Do you use the coconut oil on your eye lids top and under?

    Thanks Auburn.

    Hope you all have a great weekend!

    Alba
    using elidel at night, taking atelenol, had 2 vbeam laser treatments, 46 year old female

  6. #6
    Senior Member Auburn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alba View Post

    Auburn,

    how to you cleanse with the raw honey your eye lids top and bottom?
    When I cleanse my face with the raw honey, I also massage my eyelids and eyelashes. You just use the honey as you would a liquid soap and massage very gently, no need to rub. One needs to do this twice daily; consistency pays. If you wear eye makeup, you'll have to remove that first, maybe using mineral oil.


    doesnt it get in your eyes?
    Yes, sometimes it does and, at first, this would cause my eyes to itch a bit but that only lasted a short while, I'd say a week.

    You see, when my seb derm was active, I had dry-eye symptoms and mild blepharitis. The honey masks helped a lot with that. Then I figured that, since the raw honey produces a fine antibacterial when mixed with a bit of chlorine-free water, it would make a perfect natural cleanser for seb derm sufferers. I haven't had to use eye drops ever since and no more crusty eyelashes or irritated eyelids.


    Do you use the coconut oil on your eye lids top and under?
    Yes, all over the face, including the eyelids.

    One important thing, Alba: If you have untreated/undiagnosed seb derm, cleansing with raw honey and moisturizing with coconut oil may highlight the spots where your seb derm is active. If that happens, you'll have to start treating the condition (face/scalp/ears until it clears). The method I use for cleansing is the gentlest natural prophylactic.
    *
    I've treated seb derm successfully with raw honey and virgin coconut oil and have been symptom-free since June '09. Follow this ---> link <--- for details.

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    Thanks Auburn. Thankfully to God I don't have SD, but i do have very dry eyes one thing that doesnt help is that i have to sleep with a fan directed to my face and this makes my eyes very dry but this is the only way i can sleep a ceiling fan does not help.

    I have never had the sticky eyelids etc just very dry eyes. I dont see any flakes on my eye lashes.

    I havent bought the raw honey yet. I have been afraid to use it on my scalp i only get itchy at times and bumps no dry flakes. but im afraid to use it on my scalp cuase then it can make my face bad and i dont have SD.

    Hope you have a great week!

    Alba
    using elidel at night, taking atelenol, had 2 vbeam laser treatments, 46 year old female

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    I actually use honey eye drops. I purchased them from Dancing Bee Acres on-line. There are no additives, no other ingredients, just honey. They come in a little squeeze bottle. They sting like heck the first time, then you get used to them. I also let the raw honey from washing get into my eyes a bit.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Auburn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alba View Post

    Thanks Auburn. Thankfully to God I don't have SD, but i do have very dry eyes one thing that doesnt help is that i have to sleep with a fan directed to my face and this makes my eyes very dry but this is the only way i can sleep a ceiling fan does not help.
    You are welcome, dear Alba.

    The fan doesn't help with your eye condition, unfortunately, because, at times, when we sleep, our eyes may slightly open.


    I have never had the sticky eyelids etc just very dry eyes. I dont see any flakes on my eye lashes.
    That's good news.


    on my scalp i only get itchy at times and bumps no dry flakes.
    I am not saying that you have it but you can have seb derm on scalp without noticeable flakes. Itching and little bumps are symptoms of seb derm, though.

    A great week ahead to you too.
    *
    I've treated seb derm successfully with raw honey and virgin coconut oil and have been symptom-free since June '09. Follow this ---> link <--- for details.

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    Hi Supramom2000,

    I'm glad to hear that you've had good results with the honey/oil treatment and that cleansing with the raw honey has helped your eye condition as well.

    Take care.
    *
    I've treated seb derm successfully with raw honey and virgin coconut oil and have been symptom-free since June '09. Follow this ---> link <--- for details.

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