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Thread: Block effects of niacin

  1. #1
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    Default Block effects of niacin

    I've just been doing some research on niacin and rosacea. It seems in high doses it causes blood vessels to dilate, flushing and itching.
    Some foods high in niacin are salmon, chicken, butternut squash. This is a bit worrying as I eat those foods every day! I stay away from beef and am possible allergic to pork and lamb.

    Should I be avoiding these foods or will an antihistamine and aspirin a day neutralise any niacin effects? or should I just not worry about it any carry on eating what I already do?

  2. #2
    Senior Member IowaDavid's Avatar
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    I've taken niacin supplements before my laser treatments a few times. It is a CLEAR vasodilator. Not sure how it affects you in food, but, in supplement form, you get a few times the RDA all at once and you can get blotchiness, itching, and a very warm/red face. It's seriously odd to take a bunch of Niacin in order to provoke flushing.

    Normally, multivitamins use niacinamide, which doesn't make you flush, but gives you the same nutritional value.

    Not sure if this helps, but, yes--niacin is a flush-inducer.
    35 year-old male
    Erythmatotelangiectatic rosacea & Ocular
    20 + laser treatments.
    Toleraine Soothing Light Facial Fluid for moisturizer. I don't use a special cleanser. Clonidine daily; klonopin sometimes.
    BEST and CURRENT TREATMENT I use: Low-Level Red Light Therapy LED array.
    Please feel free to PM me with your low-level red light therapy (LLRLT) questions. I'm happy to help if I can.

  3. #3
    Senior Member PA Dancer's Avatar
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    From The National Institute of Health (NIH)

    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/e...cle/002409.htm

    Definition: Niacin is a type of B vitamin. It is water-soluble, which means it is not stored in the body. Water-soluble vitamins dissolve in water. Leftover amounts of the vitamin leave the body through the urine. That means you need a continuous supply of such vitamins in your diet.

    Function: Niacin assists in the functioning of the digestive system, skin, and nerves. It is also important for the conversion of food to energy.

    Food Source: Niacin (also known as vitamin B3) is found in dairy products, poultry, fish, lean meats, nuts, and eggs. Legumes and enriched breads and cereals also supply some niacin.

    Side Effects: A deficiency of niacin causes pellagra. The symptoms include inflamed skin, digestive problems, and mental impairment.

    Large doses of niacin can cause liver damage, peptic ulcers, and skin rashes. Even normal doses can be associated with skin flushing. It can be prescribed as a treatment for elevated total cholesterol and other types of lipid disorders, but it should only be used with medical supervision due to its potential for severe side effects.

  4. #4
    Senior Member PA Dancer's Avatar
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    I posted the above information from the governments health web site.

    I eat chicken/ turkey, beef, and dairy every single day.

    I guess all of things things can effect everyone differently.
    Have you seen an allergist?

  5. #5
    Senior Member redhotoz's Avatar
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    Flushing Niacin will bring on a flush...for anyone (as far as I know). I believe this could also be a good thing for us Rosies! Arrgghh! I'll quote from Bee Wilder (the diet I was on last year):

    "There is nothing to be afraid of
    when you get a niacin flush. Your skin gets hot, red and a bit itchy
    but think of how much it is doing for you; it is dialating (widening)
    all of your blood vessels; it's getting rid of the radiation in your
    body (from the sun, microwave, TV, etc. exposure) and helping clear
    out your veins and arteries; it's also oxygenating the blood and is
    listed as a substance for curing candida."


    I found that treating my Candida also helped my Rosacea. You can decide for yourself though, as many of the 'no-no lists' for Rosacea include Niacin. I believe it is a good thing for us Rosies! Why not jump in and get the heat out before another flush happens?! Mmm!

    Jen

  6. #6
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    I've found that since I'm less sensitive to everything now, I can eat foods containing niacin with almost no reaction. I still try to avoid them.

  7. #7
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    I took one small niacin tablet a few years ago before my IPL appointment. I swear within 15 minutes, my entire body was blotchy and my face was bright red. I walked into the derms office and felt like a tool .. lol

    I'll never do that again.

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